A team of scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has identified a set of genes that control stem cell production in tomato. Mutations in these genes explain the oriA team of scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has identified a set of genes that control stem cell production in tomato. Mutations in these genes explain the origin of mammoth beefsteak tomatoes. More important, the research suggests how breeders can fine-tune fruit size in potentially any fruit-bearing crop.

In its original, wild form the tomato plant produces tiny, berry-sized fruits. Yet among the first tomatoes brought to Europe from Mexico by conquistador Hernan Cortez in the early 16th century were the huge beefsteaks. Producing fruits that often weigh in at over a pound, this variety has long been understood to be a freak of nature, but only now do we know how it came to be.

The secret of the beefsteak tomato, CSHL Associate Professor Zachary Lippman and colleagues show, has to do with the number of stem cells in the plant's growing tip, called the meristem. Specifically, the team traced an abnormal proliferation of stem cells to a naturally occurring mutation that arose hundreds of years ago in a gene called CLAVATA3. Selection for this rare mutant by plant cultivators is the reason we have beefsteak tomatoes today.

The first field trial of genetically modified (GM) potatoes resistant to potato blight conducted in Uganda from October 2015 to January 2016 has been completed at the Kachwekano Zonal Agricultural Research and Development Institute (KaZARDI) of the National Agricultural Research Organization (NARO) near Kabale.
Twelve highly resistant GM potatoes of ‘Desiree' and one of ‘Victoria' varieties from the International Potato Center (CIP) showed extreme levels of resistance compared to the non-GM plants of the same varieties.

Michigan State University (MSU) scientists are looking at the biochemisty of plants in a research that could lead to plants that are less susceptible to insects. In Professor Robert Last's Laboratory, postdoctoral scholar Pengxiang Fan and undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology student Abigail Miller were able to reconstruct the pathway of chemical processes that a tomato plant uses to create useful compounds called acyl sugars.

Des scientifiques de Virginia Tech ont révélé une nouvelle voie d’étude des gènes du moustique en utilisant une méthode d’édition du génome connue sous le terme CRISPR-Cas9. L’édition de génome permet aux scientifiques d’étudier le génome des organismes en enlevant ou ajoutant certains gènes afin d’observer de quelle manière l’organisme est affecté. CRISPR-Cas9 rend l’édition de génome plus efficace et accélère le développement de nouvelles stratégies de contrôle des moustiques ou de prévention des maladies.

Le Riz Doré est l’espoir des enfants. Permettre au riz Doré d’être disponible sur les marchés donnera un meilleur avenir aux enfants » a dit le Dr. Patrick Moore, co-fondateur et ancien membre du groupe Greenpeace et actuellement président et porte-parole de la campagne Allow Golden Rice.